It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia WITH Kaitlin Olson

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia WITH Kaitlin Olson

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Chaunce Hayden: What makes It’s Always Sunny In
Philadephia” so popular year after year?
Kaitlin Olson: Well, I think we fell into the groove of how
to do it. Plus, Danny DeVito, added such a magical piece to
the puzzle. He just fit right in immediately with all of us. He
adds an amazing dynamic to the show. All of us are just a
great team and we mesh so well together.
Is it true that the initial pilot was made for just $200 on a
home computer?
That’s the word that’s going around.
Well?
That $200 number has really been flying around the country.
The truth is, it cost whatever the tape cost and whatever
lunch cost. So yeah, it was probably around $200. And yes,
they did it on a computer. It was very, very cheaply made.
But they wanted it to look like that. They wanted it to look
like a documentary. But yes, the rumor is true. Absolutely no
money went into the pilot. For lighting they flipped the light
switch on. That’s the truth!
Initially, the show was supposed to be about three
unemployed actors in LA. But FX didn’t like the idea. Why?
Well, FX thought that Entourage and The Comeback were
already out there. There were a lot of shows that were about
Hollywood, and being actors in Los Angeles. They just didn’t
want to compete with that market. They thought it was alittle overdone. But they loved the characters and they loved
the ideas. So they just said, “Relocate it.” Rob, Charlie and
Glen originally wanted it to be about actors because that’s
what they were doing. They were just writing about stuff
that was going on in their lives, and the stupid conversations
they were having. But the truth is a show like this can be set
anywhere. So they decided to put it in a bar in Philadelphia
because Rob is from Philadelphia and bartenders have a lot
of free time to get themselves into trouble.
Is the show actually filmed in Philly?
It’s actually shot in LA, but we do go to Philadelphia for about
a week and a half just to do some exterior shots.
What kind of feedback have you gotten from the people of
Philadelphia?
We got a really
warm reception from
the people there! I
think they like to be
represented and they
also think the show is
funny. The people of
Philly are really proud
of it.
Are you telling me
that Philadelphians
are sick of being
New York City’s poor
stepchild?
[Laughs] Yeah! I think
they feel a sense of
belonging now. Also,
the original fans of
the show take a lot of pride in it because the show was so
underground in the beginning.
I give you credit for working without a laugh track. That
takes guts.
I don’t think it takes guts. I really think that’s where the trend
is heading. I did Curb You’re Enthusiasm before this show,
and they didn’t have a laugh track either. The truth is, in your
head you know people are laughing somewhere. There
are people laughing in the control room! I never feel that
because I’m not getting instant feedback something must
not be funny. I think it’s much better without a laugh track. I
hate it when shows force-feed you and tell you when you’re
supposed to laugh. Hopefully, the whole show is funny and
you’re just laughing when you feel like it.
Can you give me an example of when you actually peed your
pants from laughing?
I can! When I read this in the script I was in a room by myself
and I laughed out loud! My dog didn’t know what was going
on! How can I say this? I end up pretending to need arm
braces because I’m trying to get attention from a guy who is
working in a clothing store. And so I’m reaching with my arm
braces trying to get a hat off of a high place and the store
employee asks if I need help and I say, “It’s really important
to me that I do this by myself.” And he says how proud he is
of me. I thought it was just genius pretending to be crippled
to get attention.
Now that goes back to being shocking. How many
complaints from crippled people are you estimating you’ll be
getting?
[Laughs] You can’t take offense because in the context of the
show these characters are just such losers! If they’re doing
something like that it’s okay to laugh at it because you’re
just laughing at the
characters. We’re
lovable losers! It’s not
like we’re making fun
of racism or cancer.
We’re just pointing
out that things that
happen in life are
sometimes funny even
when you’re not really
supposed to laugh at
them. But it’s awkward
and it’s uncomfortable
and that’s what’s
funny. Like when the
teacher tells the whole
class to stop laughing.
That’s always when
you laugh the most.
Why do most people
not find attractive female comics as funny as male comics?
That’s a great question. I think the real shame is why
aren’t there more funny beautiful women on TV. I know a
lot of them personally. I think that the stigma is that only
men can be funny, or only quirky, unattractive women
can be funny. I think that’s because you really can’t take
yourself too seriously if you want to be funny. A lot of
people who are wrapped up in what they look like are
taking themselves a little bit too seriously. The truth
is, I was always lanky and awkward in high school. No
boys liked me. So I certainly didn’t grow up thinking I
was beautiful. I had to find a way to fit in, and I did it by
making people laugh. But I would like to think that you
could be both attractive and funny.
When can we expect to see you naked on the show?
If FX plans on getting me naked, then they need to pay
me a lot more then what they’re paying me right now! I’ll
just say that.

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